NPR logo Michael Jackson's Family Has No Funeral Plans Yet

Michael Jackson's Family Has No Funeral Plans Yet

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Sharpton, left, and Jackson at today's news conference. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Jackson, the pop superstar's father, and Rev. Al Sharpton, had a press availability this afternoon and one takeaway was that the family hasn't yet scheduled memorial services but that the patriarch expects there will be some public aspect to it whenever it happens.

But they're not rushing anything according to Sharpton, a family friend. "As a family, they came out of Gary (Indiana) and they gave the world a whole new glow. And they must be careful to protect that glow and not rush into something that may feed the media frenzy but not uphold the legacy of Michael Jackson," Sharpton said.

Jackson confirmed that the family ordered a private autopsy from which he said he expected results today. "We're searching to see what happened to Michael. We don't have the time frame (for funeral services) yet because I want to see how this autopsy's coming out, the private autopsy."

When asked if he was gratified by a family court judge's decision to place his famous son's three children with him and his wife, Jackson said "Of course, this is where they belongs... We're going to take care of them and give them the education they're supposed to have. We can do that."

Joe Jackson is a controversial figure because of stories over the years that he physically and emotionally abused his children when they were young, especially Michael.

The controversy continues after his son's death, with Jackson apparently promoting a new record company he's starting during a red-carpet interview before the BET Awards program Sunday night which was dedicated to his son. That certainly raised some eyebrows. Today he said he was merely answering a journalist's question when he mentioned the record company.

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