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No 'Daylight' Between White House & Pentagon On Afghanistan, Gen. Jones Says

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No 'Daylight' Between White House & Pentagon On Afghanistan, Gen. Jones Says

No 'Daylight' Between White House & Pentagon On Afghanistan, Gen. Jones Says

Despite reports in the news media of the White House and Defense Department being "at odds" (in U.S. News & World Reports' opinion) over whether more U.S. troops should soon be sent to Afghanistan, White House national security adviser James Jones just told All Things Considered co-host Melissa Block that he sees no "daylight" between the views at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue and at the Pentagon.

Their discussion began with Melissa asking about reports, such as this one by McClatchy Newspapers that Jones has told commanders "they won't get any more troops this year beyond what President Barack Obama already has promised."

Jones, a retired Marine general, told her that isn't exactly the message he's been giving. Instead, he said the White House just wants to see how the new U.S. strategy — adding 21,000 soldiers and Marines to the force in Afghanistan — works before considering whether even more are needed:

No 'Daylight' Between White House & Pentagon On Afghanistan, Gen. Jones Says

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Later in the interview, Melissa asked if the White House would be open to adding more troops if commanders request them. Jones said the president will always "listen to whatever the senior commanders on the ground" and others in the chain of command recommend. "If we have to do it again we have to do it again,"Jones added:

No 'Daylight' Between White House & Pentagon On Afghanistan, Gen. Jones Says

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There will be more from Melissa's conversation with Jones on today's ATC. Click here to find an NPR station near you.

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In Afghanistan, Marines have launched a major operation in the south as they aim to take control of villages now in the hands of the Taliban. Earlier this afternoon, NPR's Graham Smith reported from one of the villages that Marines are now operating from.

Jones watches President Obama during a June 16 Rose Garden event. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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