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Students, But Not Crows, Reacted To Cheney Mask

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Students, But Not Crows, Reacted To Cheney Mask

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Students, But Not Crows, Reacted To Cheney Mask

A little left-wing (pun intended) bias showing?

In the middle of Robert Krulwich's report on Morning Edition about "The Crow Paradox," a bit of politics pops up.

When researchers from Cornell University and the University of Washington decided to test whether crows can tell people apart, one wore a caveman mask while putting bands on crows. Then, he had volunteers wear the same mask as they walked across Washington's campus. The crows' reaction to the volunteers? Lots of cawing and angry flapping — a sign that they recognized the "face."

Then, the researchers had volunteers walk across campus in a Dick Cheney mask.

Students reacted, they report, but not the crows.

Hmm. Think they would have chosen an Obama mask?

Here' is Robert's report:

Students, But Not Crows, Reacted To Cheney Mask

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Not so scary to a crow. Peace activists poked fun at then Vice President Dick Cheney in Lincoln, Neb., in 2004. Bill Wolf/AP hide caption

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Bill Wolf/AP

Update at 10:45 a.m. ET. Here's a video explanation of the paradox from Robert: