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JetBlue Offers $599 'All You Can Jet' Pass

JetBlue plane in Boston.

JetBlue plane in Boston. Michael Dwyer/AP Photo hide caption

toggle caption Michael Dwyer/AP Photo

JetBlue wanted to break through the clutter of airline promotions and it appears to have succeeded with its $599 "all you can jet" deal.

From now through Aug. 21, customers can buy a pass that lets them fly anywhere the airline flies for one month, between Sept. 8 to Oct. 8.

Of course, because it's an airline, there are a lot of conditions. The passes are only available "while supplies last" so, conceivably, the program could end before Aug. 21.

Customers also have to book flights at least three days before their scheduled departures. Here's another: if can "only book one per city per day; if a violation of this policy is found, JetBlue will honor only the last booking made and cancel the customer's other bookings from that city on that day."

So forget trying to hold seats on several flights.

And then there's a really nasty no-show policy. Don't show up for a flight and you'll have to cough up $100 bucks and won't be able to use your pass until you pay the fee.

Travel expert Rudy Maxa, told NPR's Madeleine Brand, an All Things Considered host that the new pass is a good deal if you live in or near one of the 57 cities JetBlue flies out of.

And he rather doubted that major airlines would match JetBlue's pass since JetBlue is a point to point airline which flies from one city to another. Southwest Airlines uses a similar approach.

The majors, however, operate more complex hub-and-spokes route systems, often flying passengers into hubs like Chicago or Atlanta then transporting them to their final destinations.

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