America

Renewed Anti-Government Protests In Iran; Deadly Blast In Pakistan

This morning's breaking news includes:

Los Angeles Times — "Pro- And Anti-Government Marchers Face Off In Tehran;" Ahmadinejad Questions Holocaust Again: "Tens of thousands of demonstrators chanting, 'Not Gaza, not Lebanon, I sacrifice my life for Iran,' swarmed the streets of the capital, turning a day in support of the Palestinian cause into a major opposition rally. President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, whose disputed reelection three months ago triggered Iran's worst political domestic crisis in decades, delivered a blistering condemnation of Israel on the occasion of annual Quds Day. In a fiery speech, he questioning the Holocaust and blamed 'Zionists' for ongoing wars in the Middle East."

Related story by the Associated Press — Reformist Attacked: "Iran's President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad lashed out at Israel and the West saying Friday the Holocaust was a lie and a pretext for occupying Palestinian lands, while hard-liners attacked a reformist cleric who was marching with the opposition at an anti-government rally in Tehran."

Related story from NBC News — "Ahmadinejad Refuses To Rule Out" Developing Nuclear Weapons: "Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad refused Thursday to explicitly rule out development of nuclear weapons and said in an interview with NBC News that he would 'never' halt Tehran's work on peaceful nuclear programs to mollify Western skeptics." Asked if he stole Iran's June election, Ahmadinejad said "I don't know what you mean by that. ... We should be courageous enough to accept the vote of the people." And, he said of the death of protester Neda Soltan: "I was saddened as well ... We are treating it as a suspicious death."

— The Associated Press — Suicide Bomb Kills 25 In Northwest Pakistan: "A suicide bomber rammed an explosives-laden vehicle into a hotel in a northwest Pakistan market Friday, killing 25 people in a possible sectarian attack, police and a government official said. The attack in Usterzai village on the outskirts of Kohat town was the second in two days in the area, which is not far from the Afghan border and has witnessed past incidents of violence between Sunni and Shiite Muslims. A bomb Thursday in Kohat wounded six people."

— NPR News — Double Suicide Attack In Somalia Condemned:" NPR's Paul Brown introduces a report from Ofeibia Quist-Arcton on the deadly twin suicide bomb attacks in Mogadishu:

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Other stories making headlines include:

Morning Edition — For Some In Europe, "A Sense Of Betrayal" After U.S. Shift In Missile Defense Plan. NPR's Eric Westervelt reports:

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Related Morning Edition report from NPR's Mike Shuster — "New Picture Of Iran's Progress On Missile Development" Led To Change In Plan:

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Related story by The Times of London — "Obama Scraps Star Wars And Gambles On Russia."

The New York Times — "Reasons Unclear For Terrorist Fears": "As they zeroed in on Najibullah Zazi, law enforcement authorities came to view him as a potential terrorist threat. They raided homes connected to him, his relatives and friends in New York and Colorado, but have said very little other than to proclaim that the investigation revealed no imminent danger. The public, then, has been left struggling to make sense of what is known about Mr. Zazi and his acquaintances, his travels and intentions, if any, and how he came to the attention of the federal agents and local police who were intently tracking him."

Related story by the Denver Post — "Federal Agents Grill Aurora Shuttle Driver For Second Day": "An Aurora (Colo.) man in the cross hairs of a multistate anti-terrorism investigation met with federal agents for a second day of questioning Thursday. Najibullah Zazi, the 24-year-old airport-shuttle driver who has become the focal point in the investigation, arrived with his lawyer at the FBI's Denver offices shortly after 2 p.m. He was questioned until late in the evening and was scheduled to return for more questioning at 9 a.m. today. His attorney, Art Folsom, said earlier in the day he was confident Zazi, who has proclaimed his innocence, would not be arrested."

Boston Globe — "House Backs An Interim Senator": Massachusetts state House lawmakers "approved legislation last night that gives Governor Deval Patrick the power to appoint a temporary successor to the late Edward M. Kennedy in the US Senate, putting Massachusetts on track to have a new senator in place by next week. ... Possible candidates are believed to include former governor Michael Dukakis and former Democratic National Committee chairman Paul G. Kirk Jr., who is chairman of the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library."

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