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No Olympics For Chicago; Rio de Janeiro Gets 2016 Games

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No Olympics For Chicago; Rio de Janeiro Gets 2016 Games

Economy

No Olympics For Chicago; Rio de Janeiro Gets 2016 Games

Disappointment in the Second City. M. Spencer Green/AP hide caption

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M. Spencer Green/AP

Chicago's bid for the 2016 Summer Olympics has been turned down by the International Olympic Committee, Reuters and the Associated Press just reported.

We'll have more as the news comes in. Scroll down to see what's happening — and hit your "refresh" button to make sure you're seeing our latest updates.

Update at 2:15 p.m. ET. For those who like their news in a radio format, here's a short report from NPR's Tom Goldman:

No Olympics For Chicago; Rio de Janeiro Gets 2016 Games

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Update at 12:50 p.m. ET: And the winner is — Rio de Janeiro. The IOC just announced the news.

Update at 12:40 p.m. ET: The announcement ceremony is underway in Copenhagen, so the news about which of the remaining two cities — Madrid or Rio de Janeiro — has won the games is going to be coming shortly.

Update at 12:11 p.m ET:

The Chicago Tribune's first headline is "Early Exit Stuns Chicago". The Chicago Sun-Times is already editorializing; saying this is a "Stunning Loss For City".

Update at 12:05 p.m. ET. While we wait to hear about which city did win the Olympics, here's a trivia test:

Update at 11:55 a.m. ET: The IOC is supposed to announce the 2016 host city — which now will be either Madrid or Rio de Janeiro — around 12:30 p.m. ET.

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Update at 11:45 a.m. ET. Since President Barack Obama made such a high-profile pitch for Chicago's bid, we wonder:

Update at 11:40 a.m. ET. From Chicago, the AP reports that:

Thousands of people gathered in downtown Chicago stood in stunned silence Friday after watching the International Olympic Committee choose someone else for the 2016 Summer Olympics. ...

The vote in Copenhagen was carried on huge television screens in the Daley Center. ...

(When the news was announced) an audible gasp could be heard from the crowd. Many stood for a few minutes, staring at the screen, and at least one flung his hands into the air in a crude gesture toward the TV screen.

Within seconds, people began filing out of the plaza.

Update at 11:33 a.m. ET: This comes, of course, after President Barack Obama's unprecedented trip to Copenhagen today. An American president had never before personally lobbied the IOC on behalf of a U.S. bid.

First lady Michelle Obama spent the better part of three days in Copenhagen making Chicago's case.

Rio de Janeiro has this going for it — the Olympics have never been held in South America. Madrid has been boosted by the efforts of former IOC head Juan Antonio Samaranch, 89, who told IOC members today that "I know that I am very near the end on my time. ... May I ask you to consider granting my country the honor and also the duty to organize the games and Paralympics in 2016?"

Update at 11:30 a.m. ET: AP now adds that Tokyo's bid has also been rejected, leaving Madrid and Rio de Janeiro as the two cities still in the competition.

There's an explanation of how the IOC's voting process works here.