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Dutch To Begin Using Body Scanners

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Dutch To Begin Using Body Scanners

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Dutch To Begin Using Body Scanners

Peering beneath. Paul Ellis/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Ellis/AFP/Getty Images

Peering beneath.

Paul Ellis/AFP/Getty Images

"The Netherlands announced Wednesday it will immediately begin using full body scanners for flights heading to the United States, issuing a report that called the failed Christmas Day airline bombing a "professional" terror attack," the Associated Press reports.

According to The Financial Times, "whole body scanning machines" will be introduced at Amsterdam's Schiphol Airport "within three weeks."

As NPR's Pam Fessler reported on Morning Edition, there has been reluctance — before the incident on Christmas Day — to deploying the scanners in the U.S.:

The equipment is designed to produce full-body images of airline passengers and presumably anything they might be trying to hide. Individuals enter a booth at the security checkpoint, where they're exposed to x-rays or radio waves, which produce a cartoon-like image. It's quick and easy, according to the Transportation Security Administration.

But (U.S.) lawmakers have been among those reluctant to deploy the machines. In June, the House of Representatives voted overwhelmingly to restrict their use. The vote was big — 310-118 — and bipartisan. Members of both parties said they were concerned that the pictures were too intrusive and questioned their effectiveness.

Dutch To Begin Using Body Scanners

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