America

Haiti: Aid Continues To Pour In; Much More On Way; 1,400 Flights On 'Wait List'

Haitian women surge forward on a hill to try and get the last handouts of food rations at distributi i

In Port-au-Prince: Waiting for food distributed by the 82nd Airborne. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

itoggle caption David Gilkey/NPR
Haitian women surge forward on a hill to try and get the last handouts of food rations at distributi

In Port-au-Prince: Waiting for food distributed by the 82nd Airborne.

David Gilkey/NPR

The massive scope of the U.S. military's relief efforts in Haiti, and of the international response to the crisis there since the Jan. 12 earthquake, jump out at you from some numbers just released by U.S. Southern Command.

NPR's Tom Bowman tells us that Air Force Gen. Doug Fraser just told reporters in a video conference that:

— There is a waiting list of 1,400 flights of aid and relief workers into Port-au-Prince airport. Right now, 120 to 140 flights a day can get in.

— So far, the U.S. has delivered 1.4 million bottles of water and 700,000 meals.

— There are now 2,676 U.S. ground troops in Haiti. He expects 4,600 to be there by the weekend. And an additional 2,000 — Marines — will be offshore on Sunday.

— Another 10,445 U.S. military personnel are on 20 ships offshore, from the carrier USS Carl Vinson to the hospital ship USNS Comfort and Coast Guard ships.

— The U.S. military has 63 helicopters working in Haiti, mostly medium- and heavy-lift helicopters.

— More airstrips will soon be opening. Two are in the Dominican Republic and one is in Jacmel, Haiti.

Meanwhile, Reuters reports that:

The search for survivors of Haiti's killer earthquake started to wind down and Haiti's government said on Thursday it would move some 400,000 homeless to new villages to be built outside the wrecked capital.

The seaport in Port-au-Prince had been repaired enough to reopen for limited aid shipments, and a Dutch naval vessel was unloading pallets of water, juice and shelf-stable milk onto trucks at the pier.

For more of NPR's coverage of the crisis in Haiti, click here.

If you're looking for information on charities doing work in Haiti, click here.

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