In Haiti: Some Progress, But Much Hardship And Much Rubble Remain : The Two-Way Nearly four months after the earthquake that destroyed much of Port-au-Prince, killing a couple hundred thousand people in the process and forcing two million or more Haitians from their homes, NPR's Jason Beaubien reports from the island nation t...
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Jason Beaubien discusses Haiti with Steve Inskeep

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In Haiti: Some Progress, But Much Hardship And Much Rubble Remain

In Haiti: Some Progress, But Much Hardship And Much Rubble Remain

At the camp for displaced people in Croiz de Bouquets, Haiti, on Tuesday, a man walked by the tin walls of a latrine. (David Gilkey/NPR) hide caption

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At the camp for displaced people in Croiz de Bouquets, Haiti, on Tuesday, a man walked by the tin walls of a latrine. (David Gilkey/NPR)

Nearly four months after the earthquake that destroyed much of Port-au-Prince, killing a couple hundred thousand people in the process and forcing two million or more Haitians from their homes, NPR's Jason Beaubien reports from the island nation that while there is "a lot less rubble," in many places "it looks like absolutely nothing" has changed since buildings collapsed and life there was torn apart.

On Morning Edition, Jason also told host Steve Inskeep that "one of the biggest frustrations" he hears from Haitians is that they don't have jobs anymore and "they don't have anything to do."

The hopeful signs, Jason reports, include the opening of "schools in a box" — temporary structures that have been put up so that classes can be held. And some markets are open again.

Here and there, some have things to sell. (David Gilkey/NPR) hide caption

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Here and there, some have things to sell. (David Gilkey/NPR)

But, "hundreds of thousands of people" still live in camps and in "very desperate conditions," Jason says. And there is a great deal of worry about what will happen when the rainy season hits in coming weeks and months.

Here's the conversation he had with Steve:

Jason Beaubien discusses Haiti with Steve Inskeep

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/114642239/126525229" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Desperate for work, some Haitians are selling what little they can, like this man in Port-au-Prince on Tuesday. (David Gilkey/NPR) hide caption

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Desperate for work, some Haitians are selling what little they can, like this man in Port-au-Prince on Tuesday. (David Gilkey/NPR)