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U.K. Media Say Conservative Is Going To Get Prime Minister's Post

Reuters reports that Britain's ruling Labour Party says talks with the Liberal Democrats about a coalition government have only broken off "temporarily." But British news media are saying it looks like Conservative Party leader David Cameron will be the U.K.'s next prime minister:

— "Labour recognize their efforts to do a deal with the Lib Dems to stay in power are over, the BBC understands. The decision appears to clear the way for a Lib Dem and Tory deal which would see David Cameron succeeding Labour's Gordon Brown as prime minister." (BBC News)

— "Gordon Brown is set to resign tonight and allow David Cameron to be Britain's new Prime Minister. The Labour leader's final desperate attempt to cling on to power with a Lib-Lab deal crumbled amid a rebellion on his own side and policy disagreements with Liberal Democrat leader Nick Clegg." (London Evening Standard)

— "A deal between the Tories (Conservatives) and the Lib Dems is now looking likely. The Lib Dem negotiating team is now talking again to the Tories. Last night the Conservatives did not have any plans to talk to the Lib Dems again. But the talks started again at 2 p.m., at the Cabinet Office." (The Guardian)

In last Thursday's general elections, the Conservative Party won the most seats in parliament — but not enough to form a government on its own. Labour came in No. 2. The Lib Dems were well behind the other two, but won enough seats to be able to give either the Conservatives or Labour enough to govern in a coalition.

Update at 1:28 p.m. ET: Sky News is also now saying that Brown will resign tonight. And, it notes that:

"Alastair Bruce, Sky's constitutional expert, reminds us that the only way Gordon Brown can actually resign is by going to the Queen. He will say, please may I resign as your PM? She will ask him - who shall I call?"

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