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In 'Rolling Stone' Article, Gen. McChrystal Criticizes Biden And Holbrooke

U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan Karl Eikenberry, left, and U.S. Army Gen. Stanley McChrystal, right, meet with local Afghan officials at the Hamkari Conference, Cooperation for Kandahar, at the Mandigac Palace, in Kandahar Afghanistan Monday June 21, 2010. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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David Gilkey/NPR

U.S. Ambassador to Afghanistan Karl Eikenberry, left, and U.S. Army Gen. Stanley McChrystal, right, meet with local Afghan officials at the Hamkari Conference, Cooperation for Kandahar, at the Mandigac Palace, in Kandahar Afghanistan Monday June 21, 2010.

David Gilkey/NPR

As we reported earlier, the American commander in Afghanistan has apologized for dismissive comments he and his aides made about a wide number of people in the Obama administration, which will appear in a forthcoming issue of Rolling Stone magazine, in an article called "Runaway General."

Gen. Stanley McChrystal has been summoned to the White House, where he is scheduled to meet with the president on Wednesday.

NPR has obtained an advance copy of the article, reported by Michael Hastings, in which McChrystal and his staff — described as "a handpicked collection of killers, spies, geniuses, patriots, political operators and outright maniacs" — criticize White House and State Department officials, including Vice President Joe Biden and Ambassador Richard Holbrooke.

(A spokesman for Rolling Stone says the article will be available on the magazine's website later today.)

The profile highlights the president's contentious relationship with his commander in Afghanistan, among other things.

"Last fall, with his top general calling for more troops, Obama launched a three-month review to re-evaluate the strategy in Afghanistan," Hastings writes. "'I found that time painful,' McChrystal tells me in one of several interviews. 'I was selling an unsellable position.'"

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McChrystal was an advocate for more troops, for a larger footprint in Afghanistan.  After he made his decision, the president criticized the general for being so outspoken.

The article also probes the relationship between McChystal and Karl
Eikenberry, the U.S. ambassador to Afghanistan, which is fraught:

"According to those close to the two men, Eikenberry — a retired three-star general who served in Afghanistan in 2002 and 2005 — can't stand that his former subordinate is now calling the shots."

UPDATE at 12:15 p.m. ET: You can read "Runaway General" here, in its entirety.