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Army Intel Analyst Arrested In Connection With Leak Of Iraq Video

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Army Intel Analyst Arrested In Connection With Leak Of Iraq Video

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Army Intel Analyst Arrested In Connection With Leak Of Iraq Video

"Federal officials have arrested an Army intelligence analyst who boasted of giving classified U.S. combat video and hundreds of thousands of classified State Department records to whistleblower site Wikileaks," Wired.com's Threat Level blog is reporting.

Wired says it's been told by a member of the analyst's family that he's being held in custody in Kuwait and has not yet been formally charged.

Update at 8:25 a.m. ET. A short time ago, the Army released this statement:

"United States Division-Center is currently conducting a joint investigation of Spc. Bradley Manning, 22, of Potomac, Md., who is deployed with 2nd Brigade 10th Mountain Division, in Baghdad, Iraq. He was placed in pre-trial confinement for allegedly releasing classified information and is currently confined in Kuwait. The Department of Defense takes the management of classified information very seriously because it affects our national security, the lives of our Soldiers, and our operations abroad. The results of the investigation will be released upon completion of the investigation."

The highest-profile leak associated with the case was a video that surfaced in early April. It shows a 2007 incident in which the crew of a U.S. Army helicopter fired on a group of men in Baghdad, killing 12 civilians. The fatalities included two people employed by the Reuters news agency — a photographer and a driver.

Update at 8:45 a.m. ET. A few minutes ago, Morning Edition co-host Steve Inskeep spoke with Wired's Kevin Poulsen, one of the reporters who wrote the Threat Level post. Poulsen said that Manning has told infamous hacker Adrian Lamo about the leaks. Poulsen also said he has seen the online chats that the two men had, and that Manning "is very convincing. ... He has a lot of information (and) an elaborate story about how he discovered the video, his first thoughts upon seeing it, how he made the connection to this incident in Iraq and how he went about contacting WikiLeaks."

Here is some of the conversation Steve had with Poulsen:

Army Intel Analyst Arrested In Connection With Leak Of Iraq Video

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The as-aired version of their discussion will be posted here later this morning.

Update at 9:10 a.m. ET: The New Yorker just took a look at WikiLeaks and its founder, Julian Paul Assange.

Update at 9:55 a.m. ET. And the Morning Edition conversation is now online:

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