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Baseball's Selig Doesn't Change Perfect Game Call... Yet

Home plate umpire Jim Joyce wipes tears during the exchange of lineup cards between Cleveland Indians bench coach Tim Tolman, left, and Detroit Tigers pitcher Armando Galarraga, right before a game in Detroit Thursday, June 3, 2010. Paul Sancya/AP Photo hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP Photo

Home plate umpire Jim Joyce wipes tears during the exchange of lineup cards between Cleveland Indians bench coach Tim Tolman, left, and Detroit Tigers pitcher Armando Galarraga, right before a game in Detroit Thursday, June 3, 2010.

Paul Sancya/AP Photo

Major League Baseball Commissioner has a statement out Thursday afternoon in which he doesn't say he will change umpire Jim Joyce's botched call that kept Detroit Tigers pitcher Armando Galarraga from recording a perfect game.

But he doesn't seem to categorically reject doing so, either, at least, not the way I read his statement.

Here's the critical last paragraph from Selig's statement:

"As Jim Joyce said in his postgame comments, there is no dispute that last night's game should have ended differently. While the human element has always been an integral part of baseball, it is vital that mistakes on the field be addressed. Given last night's call and other recent events, I will examine our umpiring system, the expanded use of instant replay and all other related features. Before I announce any decisions, I will consult with all appropriate parties, including our two unions and the Special Committee for On-Field Matters, which consists of field managers, general managers, club owners and presidents."

The Associated Press is reporting declaratively that Selig won't reverse the call:

NEW YORK (AP) - Bud Selig won't reverse an umpire's admitted blown call that cost Armando Galarraga a perfect game.

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Maybe. But it seems to me Selig has left himself some wriggle room on this. And this line is very intriguing indeed:

... There is no dispute that last night's game should have ended differently. While the human element has always been an integral part of baseball, it is vital that mistakes on the field be addressed.

How do you address the mistake on the field in this case without actually addressing it by making the result conform to what everybody saw?

So maybe the decision will stand. But Selig doesn't definitively say that, does he?