America

Republican Gubernatorial Candidate Cuts First 'Ground Zero Mosque' Political Ad

Republican Rick Scott, hoping to be Florida's next governor, is the first candidate to produce a campaign ad that centers on the so-called "Ground Zero Mosque."

According to POLITICO, "Scott's campaign said the issue became relevant in the Sunshine State once the president weight into the debate and spoke about it in Panama City during the first family's weekend vacation on the Gulf Coast."

"We can't control the timing of President Obama’s offensive remarks. Perhaps you should ask the White House why our commander-in-chief chose to make this a national issue and offend Americans so close to the Florida primary," said Scott spokeswoman Jen Baker, when asked about the decision to air the ad just a week before the primary. "Floridians don't agree with him, and his remarks were particularly offensive to the Panhandle, where there is a large population of military men and women, many of whom are personally touched by the war on terror."

In the 30-second spot, entitled "Obama's Mosque," Scott references President Obama's comments on the proposed Islamic center, delivered at an Iftar Dinner at the White House.

"Barack Obama says building a mosuqe at Ground Zero is about tolerance," Scott begins. "He's wrong. It's about truth."

The truth: Muslim fanatics murdered thousands of innocent Americans on 9/11, just yards from the proposed mosque. The truth: The leader of the Ground Zero Mosque refuses to admit that Muslim extremists use terror tactics. The truth: The fight against terrorism isn't over.

At the end of the ad, the camera having zoomed in on Scott's face, the candidate address Obama directly: "Mr. President, Ground Zero is the wrong place for a mosque."

"It doesn't take six degrees of separation to see what's happening here," Mediate writes. "It could have very easily said 'Obama is wrong about the mosque' or 'Ground Zero Mosque' — but it did not."

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