Ahead Of Rescue, Trapped Miners Will Learn How To Deal With Fame, Hollywood : The Two-Way A reporter for 'The Washington Post' says 33 trapped miners -- 32 Chileans and 1 Bolivian -- are going to receive media training.
NPR logo Ahead Of Rescue, Trapped Miners Will Learn How To Deal With Fame, Hollywood

Ahead Of Rescue, Trapped Miners Will Learn How To Deal With Fame, Hollywood

Florencio Avalos, one of the 33 trapped miners, is seen on a TV set near the collapsed San Jose Mine in Copiapo, Chile, last month. Natacha Pisarenko/AP hide caption

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Natacha Pisarenko/AP

Florencio Avalos, one of the 33 trapped miners, is seen on a TV set near the collapsed San Jose Mine in Copiapo, Chile, last month.

Natacha Pisarenko/AP

As if they didn't have enough to worry about...

In The Washington Post today, foreign correspondent Jonathan Franklin writes about the trials 33 trapped miners will face after they are rescued:

After weeks of isolation, officials say, the men will soon be mobbed by the media, courted by Hollywood and stalked by paparazzi.

Psychologists and rescue workers are rushing to teach the men how best to handle their foray into the fame machine. The miners will be taught how to deal with reporters as well as the basics of opening a bank account and personal financial management.

As Franklin describes it, Copiapo, Chile, is becoming a media circus. Officials estimate there will be between 500 and 1,000 journalists on site when the workers are removed from the San Jose mine.

They'll represent radio and TV networks, newspapers and magazines, and several film outlets:

A half-dozen documentaries are in production — including the Discovery Channel's look at the mechanics of the rescue and a planned HBO program.

Tabloids are reaching out to families, offering thousands of dollars for the first interview, and hotels in the usually sleepy mining town of Copiapo are full.