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Best App Ever

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"Last Wednesday, my life changed forever. I got an iPhone." That's how Austin Seraphin's review begins on his blog. But Seraphin isn't your normal tech-loving Apple Geek. He's legally blind, he can see some light and color, he says, "but just in blurs, and objects don't really have a color, just light sources." But then he downloaded Color Identifier, an app which uses the iPhone's camera and then speaks the color. And a world opened up to him.

The next day, I went outside. I looked at the sky. I heard colors such as "Horizon," "Outer Space," and many shades of blue and gray. I used color cues to find my pumpkin plants, by looking for the green among the brown and stone. I spent ten minutes looking at my pumpkin plants, with their leaves of green and lemon-ginger. I then roamed my yard, and saw a blue flower. I then found the brown shed, and returned to the gray house. My mind felt blown. I watched the sun set, listening to the colors change as the sky darkened. The next night, I had a conversation with mom about how the sky looked bluer tonight. Since I can see some light and color, I think hearing the color names can help nudge my perception, and enhance my visual experience.

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