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On The G20 Summit

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Obama At 'Fractured' G20; Alaska Starts Vote Count; Bombings In Baghdad

America

Obama At 'Fractured' G20; Alaska Starts Vote Count; Bombings In Baghdad

The news day begins with President Obama in Seoul. He's there for the "Group of 20" summit. And as Bloomberg News says, the nations' unity has fractured "as leaders pursue own ends."

On Morning Edition, NPR's Jim Zarroli noted that "some world leaders say steps taken lately by the U.S. to stimulate growth may be making the world's problems worse":

On The G20 Summit

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(For background on the argument over what the U.S. has been doing, see this Planet Money explainer. Also, this morning The New York Times writes that "In Message To G-20 Leaders, Obama Aims To Calm Tensions.")

Other stories making headlines this morning include:

— BBC News — "Christian Areas Targeted In Baghdad Attacks": "A series of bombings and mortar attacks targeting Christian areas has killed at least five people in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad, security sources say. Six districts with strong Christian majorities were hit, and at least 24 people have been injured. The attacks come days after more than 40 people died when Islamist militants seized a Catholic cathedral."

An Afghan boy stands aside a motorbike used by a suicide bomber in Kandahar City on Oct. 23. Two civilians were killed and two others were wounded in the attack. Rahmat Gul/AP hide caption

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Rahmat Gul/AP

Morning Edition — In Afghanistan, "U.S. Thrust Has Unintended Effect On Kandahar City": "In an operation called Dragon Strike launched more than two months ago, the U.S. military has been hunting the Taliban in the fields and vineyards outside Kandahar, birthplace of the Taliban. ... There have been unintended consequences. Hundreds, perhaps thousands, of refugees are fleeing into the city. Taliban fighters are streaming there, too, and now are stepping up a terrorism campaign."

NPR's Tom Bowman and Quil Lawrence filed reports on what's happening in Kandahar:

NPR's Tom Bowman

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NPR's Quil Lawrence

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Anchorage Daily News — "Count Continues; Miller Sues Over Spelling": "Votes that misspell (Sen.) Lisa Murkowski's name shouldn't count as the state today tallies write-in ballots in the U.S. Senate race, (Republican) Senate candidate Joe Miller said in a federal lawsuit Tuesday."

Miami Herald — "Cholera Takes A Feared Turn In Haiti": "PORT-AU-PRINCE — With 73 people hospitalized for cholera in this quake-battered capital, the epidemic is spreading and has officially made its way into Haiti's largest city."

The San Diego Union-Tribune — "Disabled  Carnival Cruise Ship Now Being Towed To San Diego": "The mammoth Carnival Splendor cruise ship has been crippled off Mexico since early Monday, drifting for hours at the ocean's mercy after a fire disabled much of its engine power. The more than 4,400 people on board now have functioning toilets again. But they can’t make phone calls and have to eat prepackaged meals because there’s no refrigeration. Many are choosing to sleep on deck, preferring the sea breeze to cabins that lack air conditioning." If all goes well, the ship will get to San Diego on Thursday.

— And, lest we forget, there's the ongoing mystery over whether a missile (or a plane) caused that dramatic contrail in the sky off southern California's coast on Monday. We posted about that weird story earlier.