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Would You Get 3-D TV If You Didn't Need The Glasses?

Children from Los Angeles-area Boys and Girls Club summer camps reenact the iconic '50s LIFE magazine photo of movie goers wearing 3-D glasses. Damian Dovarganes/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Children from Los Angeles-area Boys and Girls Club summer camps reenact the iconic '50s LIFE magazine photo of movie goers wearing 3-D glasses.

Damian Dovarganes/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Toshiba seems to think so. Reuters reports the company will demonstrate two models at the Consumer Electronics Show, which opens tomorrow in Las Vegas:

The need for special glasses is considered a major factor hindering sales of 3D TVs, but rival companies have said the viewing angle for glasses-free technology is too restrictive.

The glasses-free models at CES are 56 and 65 inches; but Toshiba has apparently already introduced 12 and 20 inch 3-D sets in Japan. Here's a caution for parents: PC Magazine says Nintendo warns kids six and younger with the 3DS should not use the 3-D function:

"Vision of children under the age of six has been said [to be in the] developmental stage," according to a note posted to Nintendo's Japanese site. 3D content, including the 3DS, "delivers 3D images with different left and right eye images, [which] has a potential impact on the growth of children's eyes."

NPR's Laura Sydell is at the CES and ready to test lots of cool stuff. We'll ask her what she thinks.