U.S. House Votes To Repeal Healthcare Reform Law

A majority of members in the Republican-controlled House of Representatives just voted to repeal President Obama's healthcare law, the AP reports.

The vote was supposed to happen last week, but it was delayed until tonight after the shooting rampage in Arizona. This is largely a symbolic gesture, a move to fulfill a campaign promise from Republicans, because the repeal will likely get nowhere in the Democratically-controlled Senate.

During the debate on the floor, Republicans attacked the law, though without much of the flair that we had seen before the shootings. The Boston Globe reports:

There were no protesters outside the Capitol this morning, as there were last March when Democrats initially passed the legislation.

Both Republicans and Democrats appeared to tamp down their rhetoric in the wake of the shooting in Arizona. Republicans rarely referred to any “job killing” legislation, opting instead for terms like “job destroying”

Even Representative Joe Wilson — the Republican from South Carolina who received national attention when shouting “You Lie” during President Obama’s State of the Union address – was subdued in his remarks.

“The takeover will cripple small businesses,” he said, without raising his voice. “The liberal health care takeover destroys jobs, limits freedoms, and expands big government.”

The final vote tally was 245-to-189.

NPR's Julie Rovner reports on what's next:

Now House Republicans will turn to other efforts on healthcare, including a resolution instructing committees to come up with alternate ways of providing health insurance and cutting health costs. They'll also try to take the new health law apart piece by piece if they can, by attempting to withhold funding or repeal individual provisions.



Please keep your community civil. All comments must follow the Community rules and terms of use, and will be moderated prior to posting. NPR reserves the right to use the comments we receive, in whole or in part, and to use the commenter's name and location, in any medium. See also the Terms of Use, Privacy Policy and Community FAQ.

NPR thanks our sponsors

Become an NPR sponsor

Support comes from