International

At Moscow Airport, Metal Detectors At Entrances Not Always Used

While some people wait in a line, a woman pushes her luggage past flowers at Domodedovo airport near Moscow earlier today (Jan. 25, 2011). i

While some people wait in a line, a woman pushes her luggage past flowers at Domodedovo airport near Moscow earlier today (Jan. 25, 2011). Sergey Ponomarev/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Sergey Ponomarev/AP
While some people wait in a line, a woman pushes her luggage past flowers at Domodedovo airport near Moscow earlier today (Jan. 25, 2011).

While some people wait in a line, a woman pushes her luggage past flowers at Domodedovo airport near Moscow earlier today (Jan. 25, 2011).

Sergey Ponomarev/AP

As investigators in Russia continue searching for clues about who is responsible for the attack at Moscow's Domodedovo Airport yesterday, more information is emerging about what security was usually like at that busy international air terminal.

NPR's David Greene reported on Morning Edition that "given the terrorism risk in Russia, Domodedovo has metal detectors at airport entrances. Yet they only use them occasionally, meaning a person could have walked into the arrivals hall Monday without being screened."

And as the BBC and others are reporting today, Russian President Dmitry Medvedev says the suicide bomb attack was the work of terrorists — but is also pointing the finger at airport officials for inadequate security.

At least 35 people were killed and more than 100 others were injured. David adds that:

"So far, no one has claimed responsibility. ... Government officials suspect a suicide bombing, and one investigator told state media the remains of the presumed bomber were found.

"In past attacks, militants from the North Caucasus have been responsible. That's the volatile region of southern Russia where an Islamist insurgency is raging."

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