NPR logo Sick Of The Royal Wedding? There's A Bag For That

William And Kate: The Royal Wedding

Sick Of The Royal Wedding? There's A Bag For That

Throne Up: British artist Lydia Leith created these bags as souvenirs to commemorate the upcoming royal wedding of Britain's Prince William and Kate Middleton. The bags sell for 3 pounds ($4.83). Lydia Leith/AP hide caption

toggle caption Lydia Leith/AP

Throne Up: British artist Lydia Leith created these bags as souvenirs to commemorate the upcoming royal wedding of Britain's Prince William and Kate Middleton. The bags sell for 3 pounds ($4.83).

Lydia Leith/AP

British royal weddings bring pomp, circumstance — and tons of kitsch. But now, even the backlash against the much-hyped royal marriage between Prince William and Catherine Middleton is generating its own tchotchke.

To commemorate the mega-non-event, graphic designer Lydia Leith has created "sick bags" — yes, the bags that airline passengers in the U.S. commonly refer to as "barf bags." The simple paper bags, adorned with an image of the prince and his fiancee beneath the motto "Throne Up," come in red, white and blue.

And the reaction has been huge: Leith sold out of her initial production run of the bags, and she's doing her best to keep up with the orders pouring in from her website.

The bags go for 3 pounds — or just under $5. Leith, 24, prints them herself, adding her signature to the bottom of each bag.

According to the BBC, Leith got the idea for the sick bags "while thinking of designs for an alternative Valentine's card."

"Mostly I've had a lot of positive reactions," Leith says. "People seem to really like it, and understand that it's just a joke, and a bit of fun."

Just to be sure of that, the BBC's John Williams hit the street to see what average Britons think.

"I think that's terrible," says one middle-aged man, as his wife titters. "I like the throwing up — that's my sense of humor. But it's not very nice at all, is it?"

Another lady needed an explanation of what the bag implied. After she received it, she said, "No. That's a bit far-fetched, I'm afraid."

That may be true, but Leith is having her fun — and fighting kitsch... with more carefully thought-out kitsch.

We no longer support commenting on NPR.org stories, but you can find us every day on Facebook, Twitter, email, and many other platforms. Learn more or contact us.