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Fighting Rages In Libyan Civil War, Turkey Opposes No Fly Zone

Rebels aboard a bus drive away from the frontline near Brega, Libya. Control of the town has shifted over the weekend but rebels say they now hold it. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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John Moore/Getty Images

Rebels aboard a bus drive away from the frontline near Brega, Libya. Control of the town has shifted over the weekend but rebels say they now hold it.

John Moore/Getty Images

Update at 6:07 p.m. ET: Note that we've created a new post with some of David Greene's reporting from Tripoli.

Update at 11:18 a.m. ET:

NPR's social media producer Andy Carvin notes Libyan state TV's website has been hacked. Here's the hacked version and here's the original version.

Update at 10:35 a.m. ET:

SkyNews reports the United Nations is taking up Libya:

UN Security Council meeting on Libya and Arab League's call for a no-fly zone

Update at 10:25 a.m. ET:

Reuters reports the Group of Eight countries will talk today about what action should be taken in Libya. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is in Paris for the two day meeting.

Original post:

There are conflicting reports on who holds the Libyan town of Brega. The BBC says rebels retook the town from fighters loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi. The coastal oil town lies southwest of Bengazi, controlled by rebel forces. Brega was controlled by both sides this weekend.

On Saturday, the Arab League asked the UN to impose a no fly zone over Libya and moved to open ties with rebel leaders. But Turkey doesn't like the idea. Reuters cites Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan says it would be 'extremely unbeneficial' and could 'create dangerous results'. Any military action could be carried out by NATO of which Turkey is a member. NATO leaders say they must have a 'clear legal basis' for any Libyan action; a UN Security Council resolution could provide it.

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