NATO Takes Over Libya No-Fly Zone : The Two-Way NATO takes over no-fly zone in Libya
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NATO in Libya

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NATO Takes Over Libya No-Fly Zone

NATO Takes Over Libya No-Fly Zone

A NATO AWACS plane takes off on March 23, 2011 from Trapani-Birgi airbase in Sicily. ALBERTO PIZZOLI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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ALBERTO PIZZOLI/AFP/Getty Images

A NATO AWACS plane takes off on March 23, 2011 from Trapani-Birgi airbase in Sicily.

ALBERTO PIZZOLI/AFP/Getty Images

Fighting in Libya has intensified as NATO assumes control of the no-fly zone.

Update at 8:30 a.m. ET: Intense Fighting Reported In Ajdabiya: news from the fighting in eastern Libya is sketchy. But the Telegraph and Euronews say the fighting is increasingly grim. Telegraph reporter Rob Crilley tweets people are fleeing Ajdabiya and he's hearing loud explosions from there.

NATO in Libya

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Our original post: The U.S. is transferring control of the no-fly zone over Libya to NATO. That means no Libyan aircraft will be able to take to the skies in any part of Libyan airspace.

But NPR's Tom Bowman tells Morning Edition it's still unclear who will lead the second part of the mission in Libya - protecting civilians from attack by fighters loyal to Col. Moammar Gadhafi. Tom says that's the harder task still being worked out, as Secretary of State Hillary Clinton mentioned:

Tom says the U.S. will continue to provide refueling tankers and special listening aircraft. Now the AP reports the African Union is calling for a transition period in Libya that would lead to democratic elections.