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Gbagbo called "The Baker" - he rolls people up in flour

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Ivory Coast's Gbagbo Under Fire, Won't Surrender

International

Ivory Coast's Gbagbo Under Fire, Won't Surrender

Laurent Gbagbo loyalists captured by supporters of rival president Alassane Ouattara are held at Ouattara's headquarters in Abijan on April 5, 2011. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption -/AFP/Getty Images

Laurent Gbagbo loyalists captured by supporters of rival president Alassane Ouattara are held at Ouattara's headquarters in Abijan on April 5, 2011.

-/AFP/Getty Images

Intransigent Ivory Coast leader Laurent Gbagbo remains in an underground bunker at the presidential compound in Abijan, the country's commercial capital. NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton tells Morning Edition Gbagbo, who insists he won last year's presidential election, has absolutely no intention of resigning. He's now decided he'd rather have last year's presidential ballots recounted.

That's not going to happen.

Reuters reports fighters loyal to his rival Alassane Ouattara, the internationally recognized winner of the vote, are attacking the compound and they've apparently been ordered not to kill him. Gbagbo called for a truce Monday after UN and French troops began firing on his fighters to stop their attacks on civilians; last month he'd called for Ivorian civilians to 'neutralize' Ouattara fighters.

Ofeibea describes Gbagbo as a 'serial staller'; in Ivory Coast, she says he's got a more descriptive, French title:

Gbagbo called "The Baker" - he rolls people up in flour

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The Economist says Gbagbo appeared on television last night to clarify (or contradict) yesterday's reports that he wished to surrender, saying he only wants a ceasefire.

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