International

Body Count Rises In Northern Mexico

Reyna Guzman waits in front of the local morgue in Matamoros, Mexico, to learn if her 16-year-old son, missing since last August, is one of the 72 bodies unearthed near San Fernando. i

Reyna Guzman waits in front of the local morgue in Matamoros, Mexico, to learn if her 16-year-old son, missing since last August, is one of the 72 bodies unearthed near San Fernando. Alexandre Meneghini/AP hide caption

itoggle caption Alexandre Meneghini/AP
Reyna Guzman waits in front of the local morgue in Matamoros, Mexico, to learn if her 16-year-old son, missing since last August, is one of the 72 bodies unearthed near San Fernando.

Reyna Guzman waits in front of the local morgue in Matamoros, Mexico, to learn if her 16-year-old son, missing since last August, is one of the 72 bodies unearthed near San Fernando.

Alexandre Meneghini/AP

Many more dead bodies are turning up in mass graves in the small community of San Fernando, Tamaulipas - that's the Mexican state just south of Texas. There's a difference of opinion among elected leaders over just how many people got killed. Mexican Attorney General Marisela Morales declared 116 bodies have been discovered, according to AP.

But the mayor of San Fernando says it's at least 128 bodies. The Brownsville Herald of Texas reports Mayor Pat Ahumada, Jr. worries the toll is 'significantly underreported'. Police haven't finished searching for new graves.

It's feared the victims were men riding in buses who were reportedly kidnapped. The Los Angeles Times says Mexican authorities suspect organized drug gangs. The Zetas gang is blamed for kidnapping and murdering 72 people last August and flinging their bodies into mass graves in the same town.

The Herald reports the U.S. Consulate in Mexico believed a U.S. citizen was forced off one of the buses but U.S. consular officials say they have no information an American is among the dead. The State Department posted this warning to Americans on April 8:

The United States Consulates General in Matamoros, Nuevo Laredo, and Monterrey advise American citizens that the U.S. government has received uncorroborated information that Mexican criminal gangs may intend to attack U.S. law enforcement officers or U.S. citizens in the near future in Tamaulipas, Nuevo León and San Luis Potosi.


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