Arlington Graves Of Iraq And Afghanistan Vets Digitized By Teen : The Two-Way With his "Preserve and Honor" project, 17-year-old Ricky Gilleland has made it possible for family and friends of fallen veterans to know where their loved ones are buried at the mismanaged national cemetery and to visit from afar via the Web.
NPR logo Arlington Graves Of Iraq And Afghanistan Vets Digitized By Teen

Arlington Graves Of Iraq And Afghanistan Vets Digitized By Teen

April 20: Soldiers from the U.S. Army 3rd Infantry Regiment, also called "The Old Guard," carry U.S. Army Corporal Justin Ross' flag-draped casket during his burial ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery. Ross, 22, of Green Bay, Wis., died March 26 in Helmand province, Afghanistan. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

April 20: Soldiers from the U.S. Army 3rd Infantry Regiment, also called "The Old Guard," carry U.S. Army Corporal Justin Ross' flag-draped casket during his burial ceremony at Arlington National Cemetery. Ross, 22, of Green Bay, Wis., died March 26 in Helmand province, Afghanistan.

Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

"Richard 'Ricky' Gilleland III — 11th-grader and Junior Future Business Leaders of America computer ace — has succeeded where the Army failed," the Los Angeles Times writes this morning. "He has created the only digitized record of Iraq and Afghanistan veterans laid to rest at Arlington [National Cemetery]. His website, PreserveAndHonor.com, is a reverent catalog of the fallen, and one young man's response to a scandal of Army mismanagement, mismarked graves and unmarked remains that has rocked this hallowed place for two years."

"It's a tool to help remember people. They can go on and think, 'Wow, look at all these people who gave their lives just so I can walk around,' " 17-year-old Ricky tells the Times. He has focused on the cemetery's Section 60, "where about 700 veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan are buried, more than anywhere else in the country," the Times says.

Others have previously reported about what Ricky has done, including Washington's WUSA-TV last November. But given the scope of the problems at Arlington, including improperly marked graves and bad recordkeeping, we wanted to spread the word about PreserveAndHonor.

Ricky, by the way, plans to apply to the U.S. Naval Academy, the Times says.