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Ron Paul runs as a Republican

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It's Official: Ron Paul Is Running For President

Ron Paul

It's Official: Ron Paul Is Running For President

Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, speaks to a gathering of Tea Party supporters at the Hyatt Regency in Greenville, S.C., on May 5, 2011. Richard Shiro/AP hide caption

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Richard Shiro/AP

Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, speaks to a gathering of Tea Party supporters at the Hyatt Regency in Greenville, S.C., on May 5, 2011.

Richard Shiro/AP

Representative Ron Paul (R-Texas) declared his candidacy for the Republican Presidential nomination today on ABC's Good Morning America, telling host George Stephanopoulos his views are increasingly popular.

Ron Paul declares his candidacy for President

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Paul immediately laid out some of those conservative views. He's glad Osama bin Laden was gone but hated the U.S. lightning raid into Pakistan - because the U.S. should have gotten him earlier in Afghanistan. He doesn't believe taxpayers should foot the bill for government agencies such as FEMA, even if Americans need help when the Mississippi River floods - he says people need to buy private insurance:

Ron Paul opposes funding for agencies such as FEMA

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He says he's running as a Republican, not an independent because only wealthy candidates can afford to campaign outside the two-party system, but declared his support of the GOP.

Ron Paul runs as a Republican

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AP says Paul's political reputation is changing from 'Dr. No' to that of a tea party godfather, given his long-time work to slash federal spending and suspicion of governmental intrusion.

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