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Icelandic Volcano Spewing Ash, Could Disrupt Air Travel

A cloud of smoke and ash is seen over the Grimsvotn volcano on Iceland on May 21, 2011. i

A cloud of smoke and ash is seen over the Grimsvotn volcano on Iceland on May 21, 2011. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption STR/AFP/Getty Images
A cloud of smoke and ash is seen over the Grimsvotn volcano on Iceland on May 21, 2011.

A cloud of smoke and ash is seen over the Grimsvotn volcano on Iceland on May 21, 2011.

STR/AFP/Getty Images

No, it's not good old Eyjafjallajokull; this year's culprit is Iceland's Grimsvotn volcano, which started erupting on Saturday. The volcanoes sound like competing school teams facing Harry Potter in the Tri-Wizard Tournament. Grimsvotn is now blowing out enough ash that flights to Scotland could be disrupted, according to AP.

The Telegraph is warning a thick ash cloud could float over Scotland by tomorrow. That could prompt airline officials to cancel flights over much of Scotland, snarling traffic. No flights in Britain are yet affected, although AFP reports airspace is closed in Iceland.

The ash could drift south toward the rest of UK by the end of the week, according to BBC, but it's unclear if air travel will be affected. Scientists suggest Grimsvotn's the volcanic plume will be smaller and the ash particles larger. That's good news, because bigger particles will fall faster to the ground. Last year, ash from Eyjafjallajokull was so fine it hung in the air, threatening engines on passenger jets.

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