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Renee Montagne speaks with Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson

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In Tripoli: A 'Sense Of Abandonment'

Conflict In Libya

In Tripoli: A 'Sense Of Abandonment'

A long line for gas; Saturday (May 28, 2011) in Tripoli. Ivan Sekretarev/AP hide caption

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Ivan Sekretarev/AP

A long line for gas; Saturday (May 28, 2011) in Tripoli.

Ivan Sekretarev/AP

After arriving in Tripoli this week, NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson says she's been struck by the "sense of abandoment" in the Libyan capital.

Weeks of NATO air strikes and other allied actions aimed at stopping Col. Moammar Gadhafi's regime from attacking rebels have taken a visible toll, Soraya told Morning Edition host Renee Montagne earlier today.

The city is "amazingly abandoned," Soraya says. Many stores are closed.

A fuel shortage that in recent days led to long lines at stations is now forcing some Libyans to just abandon their cars. And that situation isn't likely to change anytime soon. Soraya says that the man who up until yesterday, when he defected, was Libya's oil minister has said that oil production in Libya has ground to a halt.

Renee Montagne speaks with Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson

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