First Lady Helps Set World Record For Jumping Jacks : The Two-Way First lady Michelle Obama helps children set world record in jumping jacks. More than 300,000 people jumped to set a record for the Guinness Book of World Records on October 11 and 12, 2011.
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First Lady Helps Set World Record For Jumping Jacks

First lady Michelle Obama kicks off jumping jack world record attempt at the White House on Oct. 11, 2011. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/ASSOCIATED PRESS hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/ASSOCIATED PRESS

First lady Michelle Obama kicks off jumping jack world record attempt at the White House on Oct. 11, 2011.

Pablo Martinez Monsivais/ASSOCIATED PRESS

Two months ago, first lady Michelle Obama gathered more than 400 children on the White House grounds to do one continuous minute of jumping jacks. They hoped enough people around the world would do the same over a 24-hour period and send evidence of their feat to the Guinness Book of World Records.

Today, the National Geographic Kids magazine announced success, saying well over 300,000 people around the world helped the "jumper-in-chief" set the new record over a full day, besting the previous jumping jack record of about 20 thousand people.

The jumping jacks challenge is part of Mrs. Obama's Let's Move! initiative tackling childhood obesity.