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Red Cross Begins Rescuing Injured From Homs

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Red Cross Begins Rescuing Injured From Homs

International

Red Cross Begins Rescuing Injured From Homs

Red Cross Begins Rescuing Injured From Homs

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The International Committee of the Red Cross said today that its crews had reached the restive city of Homs in Syria and they have begun evacuating some of those injured by the shelling.

The Telegraph reports that the Red Cross said there was no word if two wounded Western journalists were were evacuated, as well as the body of two others. The Telegraph adds:

"'The ICRC and the Syrian Arab Red Crescent are on the spot in Baba Amr, attempting to evacuate as soon as possible everyone in need of urgent help,' said ICRC spokesman in Damascus, Saleh Dabbakeh.

"Four Western journalists were included in the operation, and at least 11 ambulances and other vehicles are in Baba Amr.

"Mr Dabbakeh said that relief teams would be aiming to help everyone in need, not just the foreign reporters, once they entered the Baba Amr district, which has been under siege and bombardment since February 4."

This news comes as delegates from 70 countries gathered in Tunis to discuss the situation in Syria. As Mark reported earlier, the "Friends of Syria" group is set to call on President Bashar Assad to step down.

According to the BBC, French journalist Edith Bouvier issued a video pleading for assistance. She said she needs surgery for a broken leg "and is said to be in a potentially life-threatening condition."

Update at 3:47 p.m. ET. The Four Journalists:

We've updated this post this reflect the fact that the four western journalists have not been rescued, as The Telegraph had reported.

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