Drought Means 20 Million People In England Can't Use Hoses : The Two-Way Much of England's southeast region is suffering through the worst drought since 1976. Violating the "hosepipe ban" could result in a $1,600 fine.
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Larry Miller, reporting for the NPR Newscast

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Drought Means 20 Million People In England Can't Use Hoses

Drought Means 20 Million People In England Can't Use Hoses

No hoses, please. (2006 file photo from Knutsford, England.) Christopher Furlong/Getty Images hide caption

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Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

No hoses, please. (2006 file photo from Knutsford, England.)

Christopher Furlong/Getty Images

The words "hosepipe ban" popped up in a lot of headlines today, and since we'd never seen that phrase before we wondered what was going on.

It turns out that 20 million people in south-east England, including London, have been told they can't use hoses to water their gardens, wash their cars, fill their pools, clean their patios and a variety of other things (the BBC has a Q&A on what's allowed and not allowed).

Larry Miller, reporting for the NPR Newscast

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If you get caught using a hose, "there's a $1,600 fine," Larry Miller tells our Newscast Desk.

According to The Guardian, the region is suffering through "one of the worst droughts... since 1976 and [the hosepipe ban] could last into the autumn, or even later."

But watering cans are still OK. (2008 file photo from London.) Chris Jackson/Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Jackson/Getty Images

But watering cans are still OK. (2008 file photo from London.)

Chris Jackson/Getty Images