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Jim Marshall, Amp Pioneer Known As 'The Father Of Loud,' Has Died

Jim Marshall, Amp Pioneer Known As 'The Father Of Loud,' Has Died

If your ears are ringing after a show, there's a fair chance a Marshall amplifier was responsible. And that you're glad for it.

Only a special few might be able to "go to 11," as Spinal Tap famously boasted, but Marshall amps have been among the most popular with rock 'n' roll's superstars since the company was founded in 1960.

Jim Marshall. Marshall Amps hide caption

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Marshall Amps

Jim Marshall.

Marshall Amps

So it's with some sadness that we pass along word that company founder Jim Marshall died today in England. He was 88. A son, Terry Marshall, tells The Associated Press that his father had cancer and had recently suffered several strokes.

Tributes are showing up on Twitter from some of rock's best-known guitarists and others in the industry:

The Who: "RIP Jim Marshall, Father of Loud."

Slash: "R & R will never be the same w/out him. But, his amps will live on FOREVER! \,,/"

Derek Trucks and Susan Tedeschi: "A true innovator. RIP."

Fender USA: "An icon has passed."

Gibson: "RIP Jim Marshall."

Lemmy Kilmister of Motorhead in front of a line of Marshall amps. Dave Etheridge-Barnes/Getty Images hide caption

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Dave Etheridge-Barnes/Getty Images

Lemmy Kilmister of Motorhead in front of a line of Marshall amps.

Dave Etheridge-Barnes/Getty Images

Update at 11:50 a.m. ET. A Musical Memorial.

In honor of Marshall, here's a bit of the Allman Brothers' classic rendition of Statesboro Blues.

Allman Brothers

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