NPR logo No Federal 'Cyberstalking' Charges Against Woman In Petraeus Affair

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No Federal 'Cyberstalking' Charges Against Woman In Petraeus Affair

Paula Broadwell, whose affair with retired Gen. David Petraeus led to his resignation from the post of CIA director, will not face federal charges related to the alleged cyberstalking of another woman, according to a letter sent by the Justice Department to Broadwell's attorney.

Paula Broadwell in July 2011. ISAF/Reuters /Landov hide caption

toggle caption ISAF/Reuters /Landov

Paula Broadwell in July 2011.

ISAF/Reuters /Landov

Robert Muse, Broadwell's lawyer, has released the letter from Assistant U.S. Attorney W. Stephen Muldrow that says, in part:

"As the target of our investigation, we believe it is appropriate to advise your client that our office has determined that no federal charges will be brought in the Middle District of Florida relating to alleged acts of cyber-stalking."

As you likely recall, Petraeus stunned Washington last month when he announced he was resigning because he had "showed extremely poor judgment by engaging in an extramarital affair."

It emerged that FBI investigators had been investigating allegedly harassing emails sent to a Florida woman, Jill Kelley. The emails, it turned out, were from Broadwell. The investigation led to the uncovering of her affair with Petraeus.

Though investigators concluded that national security had not been compromised by Petraeus' relationship with Broadwell, he resigned nonetheless. A replacement has not yet been nominated.

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