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Justice Thomas' voice comes in around the 13-second mark

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Listen Carefully Or You'll Miss It: We've Got Justice Thomas On Tape

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Listen Carefully Or You'll Miss It: We've Got Justice Thomas On Tape

Justice Thomas' voice comes in around the 13-second mark

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/169718071/169720371" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

As it does each Friday, the Supreme Court has released audio recordings of the week's oral arguments.

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. Jim Lo Scalzo /EPA /Landov hide caption

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Jim Lo Scalzo /EPA /Landov

Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas.

Jim Lo Scalzo /EPA /Landov

Which means we can now hear what it was like when Justice Clarence Thomas broke his seven-year silence.

The official transcript says he spoke four words: "Well — he did not." The discussion at the time was about the qualifications of an attorney and it's thought that Thomas was making a joke at the expense of the Yale Law School, which he attended.

We're embedding a clip. The first voice is attorney Carla Sigler. The second is Justice Antonin Scalia. Thomas comes in around the 13-second mark. But there's some cross-talk and it's tough to hear. It sounds like he laughs afterward.

And that's it.

The last voice is Justice Sonia Sotomayor.