America

NOAA Predicts Warmer Than Normal Spring For Most Of U.S.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is predicting a warmer-than-normal spring for most of the United States.

It reports:

"Above-normal temperatures this spring are most likely across most of the continental U.S. and northern Alaska. Below-normal temperatures are favored for the Pacific Northwest and extreme northern Great Plains. For precipitation, odds favor wetter-than-normal conditions in the Great Lakes and Ohio Valley regions. Drier-than-normal conditions are most likely in much of the West, the Rockies, parts of the Southwest, much of Texas, along the Gulf Coast and Florida. Hawaii has an enhanced chance of being cooler and drier than normal."

In a more serious prediction, NOAA says that it expects the drought in the central and western regions of the United States will persist and new drought is expected to develop "in California, the Southwest, the southern Rockies, Texas, and Florida."

We'll leave you with two maps. First a temperature map:

A map showing above-normal temperatures in an orange hue. Below-normal temperatures are shown in blue. i

A map showing above-normal temperatures in an orange hue. Below-normal temperatures are shown in blue. NOAA hide caption

toggle caption NOAA
A map showing above-normal temperatures in an orange hue. Below-normal temperatures are shown in blue.

A map showing above-normal temperatures in an orange hue. Below-normal temperatures are shown in blue.

NOAA

Next a precipitation map:

A map showing below-average precipitation in tan and above-average precipitation in green.

A map showing below-average precipitation in tan and above-average precipitation in green. NOAA hide caption

toggle caption NOAA

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