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As Southwest Finally Cools, Southeast Gets Drenched

That's a lot of hail: the scene in Santa Rosa, N.M., after the storm blew through Wednesday. Santa Rosa, N.M., Fire Department hide caption

toggle caption Santa Rosa, N.M., Fire Department

That's a lot of hail: the scene in Santa Rosa, N.M., after the storm blew through Wednesday.

Santa Rosa, N.M., Fire Department

The good news from the National Weather Service:

"The Western U.S. will begin to cool on Wednesday after several days of record-high temperatures. Temperatures will still be hot in many locations, but will be closer to normal for this time of year."

The not-so-good news if you're in the Southeast and have outdoor plans on Independence Day:

"Much of the Eastern U.S will also experience near-average temperatures on Wednesday, but will have a chance of rain. The Southeast, in particular, will be wet with several inches of rain possible."

At least the forecast doesn't include a repeat of what happened Wednesday evening in Santa Rosa, N.M. As The Weather Channel reports, "a lone thunderstorm dumped over a foot of hail in the town."

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