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Jordan Demands Proof Of Life From ISIS Militants

Relatives of Jordanian pilot Lt. Muath al-Kaseasbeh, who was captured by ISIS militants in Syria, protest Tuesday in front of the royal palace in Amman, Jordan. Jordan has suggested it might be willing to hold a prisoner exchange for his release. i

Relatives of Jordanian pilot Lt. Muath al-Kaseasbeh, who was captured by ISIS militants in Syria, protest Tuesday in front of the royal palace in Amman, Jordan. Jordan has suggested it might be willing to hold a prisoner exchange for his release. Jamal Nasrallah/EPA/LANDOV hide caption

toggle caption Jamal Nasrallah/EPA/LANDOV
Relatives of Jordanian pilot Lt. Muath al-Kaseasbeh, who was captured by ISIS militants in Syria, protest Tuesday in front of the royal palace in Amman, Jordan. Jordan has suggested it might be willing to hold a prisoner exchange for his release.

Relatives of Jordanian pilot Lt. Muath al-Kaseasbeh, who was captured by ISIS militants in Syria, protest Tuesday in front of the royal palace in Amman, Jordan. Jordan has suggested it might be willing to hold a prisoner exchange for his release.

Jamal Nasrallah/EPA/LANDOV

Jordan is asking the so-called Islamic State to prove that a pilot the group is holding is still alive.

Mohammed al-Momani, a spokesman for the Jordanian government, said the government is seeking proof of life before it releases Sajida al-Rishawi, an Iraqi woman who was convicted in relation to a deadly attack on a hotel in Amman.

As we reported, the Islamic State was said to have released a video Wednesday that called for al-Rishawi's release before sunset Thursday. If not, the video said, the group would kill Lt. Muath al-Kaseasbeh.

The AP reports that al-Momani's statement casts doubt on whether the Jordanian government will meet that deadline.

The Sunni extremists are also holding Kenji Goto, a Japanese journalist.

Reuters quotes al-Momani as saying that Jordan is "coordinating with Japanese authorities on an effort to secure the release of Japanese hostage."

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