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Winning Powerball Tickets Sold In California, Tennessee And Florida

We know these are not the winning tickets. A customer holds a handful of Powerball tickets Wednesday at Kavanagh Liquors in San Lorenzo, Calif. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

We know these are not the winning tickets. A customer holds a handful of Powerball tickets Wednesday at Kavanagh Liquors in San Lorenzo, Calif.

Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

After numerous drawings without a big winner, there were at least three winning tickets sold for the record Powerball jackpot of $1.6 billion.

We don't know who those lucky people are — but as The Associated Press reports, we do know they bought their tickets in California, Tennessee and Florida. The news service says:

"The California ticket was sold at a 7-Eleven in Chino Hills, California, lottery spokesman Alex Traverso told The Associated Press. The winning ticket in Tennessee was sold in Munford, north of Memphis, according to a news release from lottery officials in that state. The winning Florida ticket was sold at a Publix grocery store in Melborne Beach."

Revelers flocked to that California 7-Eleven, perhaps hoping to find out who the winner was, or simply bask in the glow. Video posted on YouTube showed the crowds smiling for TV cameras, cheering and chanting "Chino Hills!"

YouTube

The six winning numbers were 8, 27, 34, 4, 19 and the Powerball, 10. Aside from the record jackpot, the lottery says that 26,110,646 tickets won something on Wednesday, though that might be just $4.

The odds of winning the grand prize are 1 in 292,201,338, according to the lottery.

Wednesday's record jackpot started at $40 million back in November and ballooned as nobody won the prize, drawing after drawing.

Now, the billion-dollar dream is over. If you're still wanting to try your luck during the next round, you could win a comparatively paltry $40 million jackpot.

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