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Super Bowl 50: Denver Broncos Take Home The NFL Title

Peyton Manning, in the first quarter of Super Bowl 50. i

Peyton Manning, in the first quarter of Super Bowl 50. Ezra Shaw/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Ezra Shaw/Getty Images
Peyton Manning, in the first quarter of Super Bowl 50.

Peyton Manning, in the first quarter of Super Bowl 50.

Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

Peyton Manning is once more on top of the world. The Denver Broncos quarterback — a future Hall of Famer in what may be his final season — is once more a Super Bowl champion. The Broncos have beaten the Carolina Panthers, 24-10.

The game fell well short of a quarterback duel, though. Again, it was the Denver defense that led the way, harassing Cam Newton, forcing turnover after turnover and even tacking on a score of their own.

It was sloppy, it was often ugly, but it was, without a doubt, the biggest game of the year. Naturally, we decided to cover it with the littlest poems we could think of: haiku.

With a hat tip to our colleagues at WBUR's Only a Game, where they've long been asking listeners for haiku, we decided it was time for us to try our hand at the art form: a three-line poem, with five syllables in the first line, seven in the second, and five again in the third.

(And yes, haiku-purists, we know the poems are supposed to be about nature, too. But give us some leeway here.)

Think of it as a syllable-conscious live-blog. We tweeted our updates in haiku as the game went on, retweeting your contributions and doing it all using the hashtag #SuperBowlHaiku. You can find all the tweets above.

Now, you might be asking yourself why, exactly, we covered the big game with all these tiny poems. Good question. That's because — well, because this is NPR.

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