Behind the Scenes

Sure, Ira Glass Has Two Emmys, But What's His VO2 Max?

Image of runners in the New York City Marathon.

A runner in the New York City Marathon with no limbs on the ground. The author of this post may require three or four. Jarrett Baker/Getty Images hide caption

itoggle caption Jarrett Baker/Getty Images

As is moderately well known, in addition to being a radio host, I am also a dedicated long distance runner. In fact, I will go so far as to say that I am the best long distance runner among those people who host hour long comedy shows produced or distributed by NPR, which basically means I can kick Ray Magliozzi's ass in the 10K.

This Sunday, I'm returning to New York, just a little more than a week after our Carnegie Hall debut. Instead of a tux, I'll be wearing shorts and singlet (it's like a snuggie, but without arms) and running the 40th annual New York City Marathon, along with some really, really fast people from Kenya and about 40,000 other plodding, sprinting, dogged runners. Look for me somewhere in the middle, desperately dueling Anthony Edwards for the title of fastest bald semi-celebrity. (Okay, the "semi" really only applies to me. He's Goose!)

More seriously: nothing helps a runner, especially an aging one like me, than support from the crowd. if you'd like to come out and cheer, first check this map of the course and find the point on the course most convenient to you. Note the mile marker nearest the spot, and then take a look at the last column of this chart. Find the mileage, add that time to the 9:40 AM start, and that's when I'll hope to be by. For example, if all goes well I'll reach the Pulaski Bridge, at the halfway point, at 9:40 AM plus 1:37, or... thinking thinking thinking... 11:17 AM.

Cheers will be welcomed. And if you're not sure it's me... if it might be another short bald dogged guy who looks like he might plotz any moment... cheer anyway. Whoever we are, we can use it.

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