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Studio Sessions

World Cafe: That '70s Week

Left to right: Graham Nash, Stephen Stills, David Crosby and Neil Young. 1974. Joel Bernstein hide caption

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Joel Bernstein

Left to right: Graham Nash, Stephen Stills, David Crosby and Neil Young. 1974.

Joel Bernstein

The 1970s may be the baby-boomer generation's musical sweet spot, at least according to the principle that you'll always love the music you first heard when you were 17. But there is also a pretty good argument that a lot of musical innovation and stylistic coming-of-age happened in those 10 years.

That's why World Cafe has put together our first "That '70s Week." All the music we'll play on air this week comes from that golden decade, and we've dug into the archives for these sessions with artists whose work in the '70s still stands out.

Hear The Sessions

  • Bonnie Raitt On World Cafe

    Bonnie Raitt performs live at WXPN's Non-COMMvention at World Cafe Live in Philadelphia. Joe Del Tufo /WXPN hide caption

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    Joe Del Tufo /WXPN

    Bonnie Raitt performs live at WXPN's Non-COMMvention at World Cafe Live in Philadelphia.

    Joe Del Tufo /WXPN

    Bonnie Raitt's session from 2016 contained music from her latest album, Dig In Deep, plus a special duet with Amos Lee on the John Prine classic "Angel From Montgomery."

    Bonnie Raitt on World Cafe

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  • Peter Frampton On World Cafe

    Peter Frampton. Gregg Roth/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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    Gregg Roth/Courtesy of the artist

    We hear Peter Frampton play an acoustic version of his best-selling 1976 double album Frampton Comes Alive.

    Peter Frampton On World Cafe

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  • '70s Singer-Songwriters On World Cafe

    Joni Mitchell strums her guitar outside the Revolution club in London. Central Press/Getty Images hide caption

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    Central Press/Getty Images

    Joni Mitchell strums her guitar outside the Revolution club in London.

    Central Press/Getty Images

    It's out to Laurel Canyon for Joni Mitchell, Jackson Browne, James Taylor and the New York interloper Carole King.

    World Cafe: That '70s Week

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  • Paul Simon On World Cafe

    Paul Simon. Mary Ellen Matthews hide caption

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    Mary Ellen Matthews

    Paul Simon.

    Mary Ellen Matthews

    We have many Paul Simon sessions in the World Cafe archives, but we last talked with that continually innovative artist in 2016.

    World Cafe: That '70s Week

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  • JD Souther On World Cafe

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    Jeremy Cowart/Courtesy of the artist

    JD Souther.

    Jeremy Cowart/Courtesy of the artist

    Revisit a session from 2015 with JD Souther, co-author of some of the Eagles' greatest hits.

    JD Souther On World Cafe

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  • Yusuf/Cat Stevens On World Cafe

    Yusuf Islam. Aminah Islam/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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    Aminah Islam/Courtesy of the artist

    Yusuf Islam.

    Aminah Islam/Courtesy of the artist

    When Yusuf Islam, a.k.a. Cat Stevens, left music to devote himself to his faith, we thought we had lost the chance to hear new music from one of the best '70s singer-songwriters. Luckily for us, that wasn't the case. He came by the studio in 2014 after his first U.S. tour in 36 years to share new and old songs along with a timely discussion of his journey.

    Yusuf Islam On World Cafe

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  • Graham Nash On World Cafe

    Graham Nash. Eleanor Stills/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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    Eleanor Stills/Courtesy of the artist

    Graham Nash.

    Eleanor Stills/Courtesy of the artist

    Graham Nash tells stories of Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young.

    Graham Nash On World Cafe

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