Ray Davies: 'Myths Are An Important Part Of America' : World Cafe The legendary frontman of The Kinks discusses his new solo album, Americana, which deals in part with his relationship, as a Brit, to the United States.
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Ray Davies On World Cafe

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Ray Davies On World Cafe

Ray Davies On World Cafe

Ray Davies On World Cafe

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Ray Davies' latest solo album is Americana. Steve Gullick/Courtesy of the artist hide caption

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Steve Gullick/Courtesy of the artist

Ray Davies' latest solo album is Americana.

Steve Gullick/Courtesy of the artist

Set List

  • "The Mystery Room"
  • "The Invaders"
  • "The Poetry"

In this session, we welcome the legendary frontman of The Kinks, Ray Davies, who is backed by The Jayhawks on his new solo album, Americana. One of the themes Davies writes about in this new batch of songs is his relationship with the United States. He says that when The Kinks first came to the U.S. as part of the British Invasion, they faced a backlash from some Americans. At one point they were banned from entering the country entirely. "One of the first things somebody said to me at the airport was, 'Are you a boy or a girl?'" Davies recalls. "And that was immigration. So we knew we were off to a bad start."

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