Passengers leave Istanbul Ataturk, Turkey's largest airport, after a suicide bomb attack Tuesday killed at least 42 people and wounded more than 230 people. Defne Karadeniz/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Envoy: 'We're Taking Out' About 1 ISIS Leader Every 3 Days

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U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon (left) and Greenland's then-Prime Minister Aleqa Hammond stand on the ice outside the city of Uummannaq, north of the Arctic Circle, in 2014. Greenland held a referendum in 1982 and voted to leave the European Economic Community, the forerunner of the European Union. Greenland's leaders say they believe it was the right decision. Leiff Josefsen/AP hide caption

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Britain Won't Be The First To Leave A United Europe. Guess Who Was?

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British Politics Remain In Upheaval After Brexit Vote

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Solar Impulse 2, piloted by Swiss pilot Bertrand Piccard, prepares to land in Seville, Spain, on Thursday. Jean Revillard/AP hide caption

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'Beautiful Flight' Across The Atlantic Is Major Milestone For Solar Plane

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A woman builds a fire at a migrant camp on the Costa Rica-Panama border. The area has seen a recent surge of migrants coming from Africa, hoping to make it to the U.S. Rolando Arrieta/NPR hide caption

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Via Cargo Ships and Jungle Treks, Africans Dream Of Reaching The U.S.

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In Southeastern England, Residents Make The Case For Brexit

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Tiny Luxembourg has the highest per capita income of all 28 EU member states. Art Silverman/NPR hide caption

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The View From Luxembourg, Where A 'Brexit' Is Unthinkable

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Inside one of Mastronardi Produce Sunset Grown's greenhouses, tomato vines hang on lines that can be adjusted so that the tomatoes are always at a height that's convenient for harvesting. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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How Canada Became A Greenhouse Superpower

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Eight months pregnant, Mara Torres stands next to a mosquito net placed over her bed in Cali, Colombia. Health officials in Cali have delivered mosquito nets to pregnant women to help protect them from the bites of mosquitoes that can transmit dengue, chikungunya or Zika. Luis Robayo /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Zika Infection Late In Pregnancy Carries Little Risk of Microcephaly

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Democratic National Committee Chairwoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz said the DNC is working to secure its network as quickly as possible. She's shown here in 2014. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Russian Hackers Penetrate Democratic National Committee, Steal Trump Research

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So You're Going To A Place With Zika? Here's What You Need To Know

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U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon speaks at the United Nations on Thursday. In a surprising admission, Ban said he came under pressure to remove Saudi Arabia from a list of countries that harm children. The Saudis had been placed on the list because of their bombing campaign in Yemen. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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Saudi Arabia Dropped From List Of Those Harming Children; U.N. Cites Pressure

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Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn (left), walks alongside President Obama during the U.S. president's visit to the African nation last July. Critics say Ethiopia has cracked down hard on the opposition, but makes modest gestures to give the impression it tolerates some dissent. SIMON MAINA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ethiopia Stifles Dissent, While Giving Impression Of Tolerance, Critics Say

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The Martyr Museum in Denmark includes exhibits on recent terrorist attacks. There are large portraits of two brothers who carried out suicide bombing attacks in Brussels in March, Ibrahim and Khalid el-Bakraoui. There are also "reconstructed artifacts" like nails that were used for shrapnel in the attack. Ida Grarup/Martyr Museum hide caption

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Denmark's 'Martyr Museum' Places Socrates And Suicide Bombers Side-By-Side

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Young boys wave smoldering tin cans at cars in Kabul, Afghanistan. The smoke from the seeds inside the cans is believed to ward off evil. Zabihullah Tamanna for NPR hide caption

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'He Had A Great Eye For A Story'

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Automated sewing machines embroider oversized patches for the tongues of New Balance sneakers at a factory in Skowhegan, Maine. Murray Carpenter hide caption

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Chinese Consumers Embrace New Balance's 'Made In USA' Label

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A Dundee marmalade jar (left) is among items recently unearthed from a 19th century landfill behind a manor house in East Anglia. In Victorian England, people transitioned from making most things at home to buying them in stores. Rich Preston/NPR hide caption

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Digging Up The Roots Of Modern Waste In Victorian-Era Rubbish

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A man performs yoga in the Babilonia favela overlooking Rio de Janeiro in 2014. The Brazilian government made a big push to impose order on the shantytowns in advance of the World Cup in 2014 and the Olympics this summer. Babilonia was once considered a model, but violence has been on the rise in the run-up to the games. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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As Olympics Near, Violence Grips Rio's 'Pacified' Favelas

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Eddie Huang is a chef and restaurateur, a TV host and the author of two memoirs. Donald Traill/Invision/AP hide caption

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Chef Eddie Huang On Cultural Identity And 'Intestine Sticky Rice Hot Dog'

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'High Highs And Deep Lows': 5 Days With Doctors Without Borders In South Sudan

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Demonstrators gather in a silent rally to mourn the death of an Okinawa woman in front of Camp Zukeran on May 22. The crime is thrusting the opposition to the U.S. presence on Okinawa back in the spotlight. The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images hide caption

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As President Visits Japan, Okinawa Controversy Is Back In The Limelight

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U.S. Air Force Lt. Col. Chance Henderson, an orthopedic surgeon, stands in the operating theater of the military hospital at Bagram Airfield in Afghanistan. Henderson is fighting to save the leg of a 6-year-old Afghan girl who was shot during a firefight between U.S. and Afghan forces and the Taliban. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Saving 6-Year-Old Ameera, Shot In An Afghan Firefight

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A shop owner waits for customers in a market in the resort town of Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt. Over the past nine months, tourism has plummeted in the country after a series of deadly attacks. Chris McGrath/Getty Images hide caption

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People Aren't Coming To See The Pyramids Or Snorkel In The Red Sea

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Egyptians pray for the victims of EgyptAir Flight 804 at Al-Thawrah Mosque in Cairo on Friday. The Egyptian military said it had found some wreckage of the plane, which was carrying 66 people when it went down early Thursday over the Mediterranean Sea. Amr Nabil/AP hide caption

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'What Can You Say?' An Egyptian Man Mourns The Loss Of 4 Loved Ones

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