A Libyan military guard stands in front of one of the U.S. Consulate's burned out buildings on Sept. 14. The U.S. is offering new details of the attack on the consulate that killed four Americans, including Ambassador Chris Stevens. Mohammad Hannon/AP hide caption

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U.S. Offers New Details Of Deadly Libya Attack

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A young Egyptian man grabs a woman crossing the street with her friends in Cairo. Vigilante groups are now taking to the streets and spray-painting the clothes of the harassers. Ahmed Abdelatif/AP hide caption

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Vigilantes Spray-Paint Sexual Harassers In Cairo

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A man walks through a former unofficial, or "black," jail in Beijing, in 2009. It's estimated that thousands of Chinese lodging protests against the government are illegally detained in secret sites such as this one, even though the government says they don't exist. Elizabeth Dalziel/AP hide caption

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For Complainers, A Stint In China's 'Black Jails'

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Skeletons: Skeleton imagery pervades this holiday. In pre-Columbian times, the Day of the Dead was celebrated in August. It now takes place on Nov. 1 and Nov. 2, coinciding with the Catholic holidays of All Saints' Day and All Souls' Day. Karen Castillo Farfán/NPR hide caption

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Journalist Kostas Vaxevanis waits to appear in court in Athens on Monday. Vaxevanis was arrested for the publication of 2,059 names of people alleged to have accounts in a Swiss bank. Orestis Panagiotou/EPA/Landov hide caption

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A Crusading Journalist's Arrest Spurs Greek Anger

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The secret to making something low-fat taste good and keep us fuller longer may be in its thickness. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Russian President Vladimir Putin is widely expected to sign a parliamentary bill that expands the definition of high treason. Critics say the definition is overly broad and would give the government sweeping powers to crack down on opponents. Alexei Nikolsky/AP/RIA-Novosti hide caption

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Russia Set To Redefine Treason, Sparking Fears

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Haiti Tent Camps Bear Brunt Of Sandy

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China's rapid expansion has been fueled in part by massive construction projects, like this one in Beijing, shown last year. But many economists say the Chinese economic model is unlikely to produce the same explosive growth in the coming years and needs to be revamped. Lintao Zhang/Getty Images hide caption

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As Economy Slows, China Looks For A New Model

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A bloodied woman is helped by demonstrators after clashes with police in a protest against an industrial waste pipeline in Qidong, Jiangsu province, on July 28. The Chinese government devotes enormous resources to suppressing dissent, but opposition to government policies is increasingly common. Carlos Barria/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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In China, A Ceaseless Quest To Silence Dissent

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Ruling Party On Track To Keep Power In Ukraine

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