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Bickering In Bangladesh; Curling; Glow-In-The-Dark Tattoos

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New Pope's 'Dream' Includes Tolerance, Compassion And Tradition

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Thousands Of Children As Young As 6 Work In Bolivia's Mines

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Nairobi Seeks Answers 2 Months After 'Kenya's 9/11'

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This photo taken on Nov. 9 and released on Nov. 30 by North Korea's official Korean Central News Agency shows American Merrill Newman inking his thumbprint onto a written apology for his alleged crimes both as a tourist and during his participation in the Korean War. KCNA/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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More than 100 Haitians were rescued this week after their crowded sailboat capsized. At least 30 more were reported dead. U.S. Coast Guard via Getty Images hide caption

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Crossing The Sea For Freedom A Familiar Story For Americans

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How to make dead fish look attractive? That's the challenge New York-based duo Shimon and Tammar Rothstein faced when they were hired to do the photography for famed French chef Eric Ripert's book On the Line. Photos by Shimon and Tammar, Courtesy of Shimon and Tammar hide caption

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Afghans hold large, expensive weddings, even those involving families of modest means. More than 600 people attended this recent marriage at a large wedding hall in Kabul. Sean Carberry/NPR hide caption

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Crashing An Afghan Wedding: No Toasts But Lots Of Cheesy Music

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The Odon Device was inspired by a YouTube video about how to remove a cork from the inside of a wine bottle. The Odon Device hide caption

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Afghan President Hamid Karzai addresses the Loya Jirga on Sunday. Karzai expressed anger at an airstrike Thursday that killed a child, saying it could imperil a security agreement with the U.S. The U.S.-led international force apologized on Friday for the killing. Massoud Hossaini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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A man and child walk in Beijing's Tiananmen Square. China's government recently announced an easing of the country's one-child policy. While the move appears to be broadly supported, many urban Chinese parents say it would be hard to afford a second child. Ed Jones/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Chinese Welcome Easing Of One-Child Policy, But Can They Afford It?

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A Chinese-produced J-10 fighter jet is displayed outside the offices of the Aviation Industry Corp. of China in Beijing. China's newly established air defense identification zone has caused much consternation in the region. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Japanese 'Prince' Switched At Birth Was Raised A Pauper

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