European countries have agreed to stop importing Iranian oil as of Sunday. This could make it harder for Iran to find markets for its crude. Iran has been filling up tankers off its coast, but analysts say it could run out of storage capacity. This photo shows oil tankers off Iran's coast in January. Kamran Jebreili/AP hide caption

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Kamran Jebreili/AP

The Egyptian Presidency released this image of Mohammed Morsi giving a speech to tens of thousands of people in Cairo's Tahrir Square on Friday. Morsi was sworn in as Egypt's president on Saturday. Sherif Abdel Monaem/EPA /Landov hide caption

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Sherif Abdel Monaem/EPA /Landov

The Challenge For President Morsi: Unite Egypt

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French President Inserts New Voice In EU Summit

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Metal Detector Hobbyists Find Rare Heap Of Celtic Coins

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Egypt's New President Officially Sworn In

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Kofi Annan Appeals To Leaders For Solution In Syria

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A man walks past a campaign sign for Enrique Pena Nieto, of the opposition Institutional Revolutionary Party. Mexicans vote for their next president on Sunday. Esteban Felix/AP hide caption

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Esteban Felix/AP

Mexicans Lukewarm About Presidential Election

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The ball boys and girls who work the Wimbledon Tennis Championships train for months to execute the perfect ball roll and bounce. Julian Finney/Getty Images hide caption

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Julian Finney/Getty Images

Silent And Unsung, Ball Boys Keep Wimbledon Rolling

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German Chancellor Angela Merkel talks with European Central Bank President Mario Draghi (left) and Italian Prime Minister Mario Monti (right) during a summit of European leaders in Brussels. They reached an agreement on a growth plan for the continent, and world markets surged. Bertrand Langlois /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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European Leaders Cling To Ideal Of Integration

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An image grab taken from Egypt's Nile TV shows Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi (center) taking the oath of office during the official swearing-in ceremony at the Constitutional Court in Cairo on Saturday. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Artist and filmmaker Zhang Bingjian sits in his Beijing studio in front of his Hall of Fame — portraits of corrupt Chinese officials. He has commissioned portraits of 1,600 officials convicted of corruption. Angie Quan/NPR hide caption

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A Portrait Of Chinese Corruption, In Rosy Pink

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Buddhists donate food and other necessities to monks as a way of earning merit for future lives. Monks have refused donations of alms from the military as a political protest in 1990 and 2007, a boycott that some monks insist is still in effect. Ye Aung Thu/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Will Reforms End Myanmar Monks' Spiritual Strike?

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Is Drug War Issue Overrated In Mexico Elections?

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