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Saving on Valentine's, What Would Rob Do?

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Saving on Valentine's, What Would Rob Do?

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Saving on Valentine's, What Would Rob Do?

These are cheap and easy. Thomas J Peterson Getty Images hide caption

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Thomas J Peterson Getty Images

Saving on Valentine's, What Would Rob Do?

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  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/100538091/100540639" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

With the economic crisis in full effect, I'm guessing this Valentine's Day is probably going to be a little less extravagant. While February 14th can fill your heart with love and romance, it can also cause grief and sorrow by emptying your wallet. Even if you spend money on a gift, there's no guarantee it won't be lame.

In this week's podcast I talked to Michele Beschen, host and creator of the B. Original Series on DIY Network and HGTV, about some frugal and innovative ways to show your love. Click above to listen to her suggestions. She even has ideas about how Valentine's Day can be a catalyst for being romantic all year long. It's easier than you might think and certainly beats shelling out $160 for two dozen roses.

By the way, if you're thinking of putting rose petals in a bathtub, DON'T! There's a good chance they could be toxic.

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