Betty Daniel gets a routine yearly mammogram from mammography tech Stella Palmer at Mount Sinai Hospital in Chicago in 2012. Heather Charles/MCT/Landov hide caption

toggle caption
Heather Charles/MCT/Landov

Breast Cancer: What We Learned In 2012

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/167973537/168394000" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Dr. Jame Abraham used positron emission tomography, or PET, scans to understand differences in brain metabolism before and after chemotherapy. Dr. Jame Abraham hide caption

toggle caption
Dr. Jame Abraham

Another Side Effect Of Chemotherapy: 'Chemo Brain'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/168141465/168186184" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Visitors to one Kansas City hospital will no longer be able to buy a Big Mac on the premises. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Keith Srakocic/AP

The number of new drug shortages each year in the U.S., from 2001 through Dec. 21, 2012. University of Utah hide caption

toggle caption
University of Utah

How A Drug Shortage Hiked Relapse Risks For Lymphoma Patients

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/168038307/168101682" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Brain scans using Amyvid dye to highlight beta-amyloid plaques in the brain. Clockwise from top left: a cognitively normal subject; an amyloid-positive patient with Alzheimer's disease; a patient with mild cognitive impairment who progressed to dementia during a study; and a patient with mild cognitive impairment. Slide courtesy of the journal Neurology hide caption

toggle caption
Slide courtesy of the journal Neurology

Despite Uneven Results, Alzheimer's Research Suggests A Path For Treatment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/168072345/168095851" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Does bell pepper and black tea sound appetizing? A computer may think so. Ryan Smith/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Ryan Smith/NPR

Computers May Someday Beat Chefs At Creating Flavors We Crave

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/167725602/168036583" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Doctors used a type of MRI test to look at the blood vessels in the brain of a woman with dystextia. The test confirmed she was suffering from a stroke on the right side of her brain Archives of Neurology hide caption

toggle caption
Archives of Neurology

Photographer David Blackwell and his wife prepared for the apocalypse. Cats and cat food? Check. Toilet paper? Check. Exploding volcanoes and hurtling asteroids? Not so much. David Blackwell/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
David Blackwell/Flickr

Food companies have begun quietly reducing salt in regular foods because low-salt items like these don't sell as well. Mel Evans/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Mel Evans/AP

Big Food And The Big, Silent Salt Experiment

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/167619160/167740710" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Reverend Run: From Rapper To Preacher

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/167623728/167623721" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript