Do You Want To Know Your DNA's Secrets?
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Pathological nail biting may be a form of grooming on steroids, but it also makes the biter feel good, unlike fear-driven OCD. Andrea Kissack for KQED hide caption

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Nail Biting: Mental Disorder Or Just A Bad Habit?
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A contractor designed the Squatty Potty to help his mother get closer to the squatting position on the john. Courtesy of Squatty Potty hide caption

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Fire department personnel, police officers and paramedics at the scene of a fatal collision on Highway 401 in Mississauga, Ontario, in July 2011. Stacey Newman/iStockphoto.com hide caption

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New Anti-Obesity Ads Blaming Overweight Parents Spark Criticism
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Just 10 to 15 minutes of counseling from primary care doctors can reduce the risk of "risky" drinking, a federal task force says. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Sara Terry and her son, Christian, in Spring, Texas. After sequencing Christian's genome, doctors were able to diagnose him with a Noonan-like syndrome. Eric Kayne for NPR hide caption

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Doctors Sift Through Patients' Genomes To Solve Medical Mysteries
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Eric Wiltz cavorts on a trampoline in New Orleans in 2010. Everything is fun and games on the backyard attractions until someone gets hurt, a leading group of pediatricians says. Sean Gardner/Getty Images hide caption

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Doctors may recommend that obese patients use weight-loss drugs to trick their hunger pangs. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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Two New Drugs May Help In Fight Against Obesity
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Evan Ciangiulli, 4, completes a warmup that teaches him the right way to lift weights. Karen Castillo Farfan/NPR hide caption

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Is CrossFit Training Good For Kids?
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What The Doctor Ordered: Building New Body Parts
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Can Government Bans Tackle Obesity?
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